gitignore-boilerplates - Shell script for cloning GitHub .gitignore templates

thechangelog:

GitHub’s .gitignore templates are awesome, but mashing them up into a new project can be a pain. Simon Whitaker has created a handy shell script to make that easier:

gibo Python vim >> .gitignore

This will copy the contents of GitHub’s Python and vim templates to your .gitignore. Brilliant.

The script also lets you list all the templates in the GitHub project:

gibo -l

Check out the source on GitHub to check out implementation, usage, or how to contribute.

Update: Lucas let us know about gemignore, his Ruby gem for the same task.

Made with Paper

Made with Paper

screenshotsofdespair:

You can’t go forward from where you are right now.
(Spotify) [@matthewbaldwin]

screenshotsofdespair:

You can’t go forward from where you are right now.

(Spotify) [@matthewbaldwin]

The fourth and final video in the Everything is a Remix series by Kirby Ferguson. If you missed episodes 1-3 I strongly recommend catching up at http://www.everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/. (via Everything is a Remix Part 4 on Vimeo)

The learning curve for Git is steep — perhaps the steepest of any VCS I’ve used. But the reason should be clear: It’s not a hammer; it’s a hardware store.
It was the only reaction I got! And I thought “Who cares about the fucking jumper, why don’t you ask me what are we going to do with the story or the character?”

Finally.

Express your barely-sated impatience at Apple’s slovenly attitude towards innovation with this simple Safari extension. Adds choice epithets to headings on www.apple.com.

Facebook fright

He missed a trick by not calling it The Likes Of Others

her0inchic:


A boy left his bike chained to a tree when he went away to war in 1914. He never returned, leaving the tree no choice but to grow around the bike.

her0inchic:

A boy left his bike chained to a tree when he went away to war in 1914. He never returned, leaving the tree no choice but to grow around the bike.

What is greatness?

My recent motorbike trip around Great Britain took me past some truly breathtaking landscapes, which reminded me of this excerpt from Kazou Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day:

We call this land of ours Great Britain, and there may be those who believe this is a somewhat immodest practice. Yet I would venture that the landscape of our country alone would justify the use of this lofty adjective.

And yet what precisely is this ‘greatness’? Just where, or in what, does it lie? I am quite aware it would take a far wiser head than mine to answer such a question, but if I were forced to hazard a guess, I would say that it is the very lack of obvious drama or spectacle that sets the beauty of our land apart. What is pertinent is the calmness of that beauty, its sense of restraint. It is as though the land knows of its own beauty, of its own greatness, and feels no need to shout it.